Three Levels of Dress: Gamine Summer Casual (Bonjour Tristesse)

If you’ve been waiting for the palette comparison–I have the photos ready, although getting them was challenging, since I’m so far north that I don’t have many daylight hours, but I’ve been sick, so I haven’t had a chance to sit down and work on the post. I decided to write this post first because some of the items are on sale, so it’s a little more time-sensitive.

Lately, I’ve had some interest in the Gamine Kibbe recommendations. I don’t know what we’re supposed to do with the recommendations for Gamine, Natural, and Classic–David Kibbe hasn’t given an answer to this, and I’m not sure if we’re supposed to be able to work them into our Soft or Dramatic/Flamboyant Image ID recs or ignore them altogether. Regardless, I actually see a lot of things in the Gamine recommendations that work for me, like the tailored dresses and geometric shapes. There are also Gamine celebrities I feel a connection to that David hasn’t moved to SG or FG yet, like Paulette Goddard and especially Jean Seberg. The comparisons to her I’ve gotten were one of keys to figuring out that I’m FG.

Last night I decided to watch a movie, and I checked out Otto Preminger, since I loved Laura so much. Once I saw he had directed Bonjour Tristesse, that was it for me. (For some reason, I had always thought it was a Godard film.) I started watching it immediately, and when I saw this title card I almost had to pause the film out of excitement:

title_card

Givenchy in the credits: Always a good omen for gamine fashion.

Indeed, the little black dress in this movie may be one I fantasize about having in my wardrobe even more than the one in Sabrina:

little_black_dress

jean_audrey

But the real star of the movie for me–and the reason behind this post–is Cécile’s (Jean Seberg) French Riviera summer wardrobe. I’ve always had a hard time when it comes to dressing for summer. I find dressing easier when I can make use of layers. I usually end up in an oversized Ramones tank top and some frayed denim shorts and call it a day. But seeing Cécile’s version of summer inspired me. It still looks so fresh and chic, despite being nearly 50 years old. I see this a lot with gamine styles, actually–they don’t really tend to look dated.

Her frequent use of men’s shirts in this movie is iconic–this hasn’t ever really been a look I’ve been into very much myself, but she makes me like it. I wonder what DA color would work best… The traditional light blue isn’t really for me.

mens_shirt

A hangover has never looked so chic:

hangover

And yes, a sleeveless blouse and high-waisted shorts are definitely going on my list:

gingham_bike

I love this kind of collar, but it’s hard to find nowadays:

rolled_neck

rolled_neck_3

The only thing I’ve seen it on recently is this dress from Boden, but it definitely doesn’t fit into the “summer casual” theme.

BodenMarisa Dress

Marisa Dress, Boden, $103.60-$118.40

Another fun outfit is this one, with a white button-down blouse that is kind of a modified sailor shirt, with a regular front but the rectangular collar in the back, so from the front it looks kind of like a hooded shirt:

white_shirt

It’s paired with patterned cropped pants, which I’m also going to hunt for:
patterned_pants

But my absolute favorite outfit is her striped-shirt-and-white-shorts outfit:
stripes_outfit

The neckline of the t-shirt makes it just a little more interesting than your basic shorts-and-a-t-shirt combo:

stripes_closeup

Accessories-wise, in the summer, she doesn’t go much beyond sunglasses and sandals or white flats, but she pairs the stunning Givenchy black dress with some slightly oversized studs and a pearl bangle:

earrings

I think the simpler approach to accessories is so fresh for summer.

While we’re still in the midst of winter, since there have been so many sales going on, I’ve already picked up a few things, mainly accessories.

bag/earrings/shoes

1) Rebecca Minkoff Small Darren Leather Messenger Bag, Nordstrom, $172.49; 2)Type 3 Leopard Lover Earrings, Dressing Your Truth, $8.78; 3) Ingrid Sandal, Boden, $43.20-$54.00.

1) Rebecca Minkoff Small Darren Leather Messenger Bag, Nordstrom, $172.49.
Olive is a great neutral for me, and gold hardware is a must. The small size keeps the bag from looking too Classic, and it’s also just right for my needs.

2) Type 3 Leopard Lover Earrings, Dressing Your Truth, $8.78.
Oversized studs are Cécile’s main accessory throughout the film. I love the geometric shape and nod to leopard print in this pair.

3) Ingrid Sandal, Boden, $43.20-$54.00.
Obviously, some simple sandals are essential for any easy summer look. These have the added bonuses of leopard print and rose gold.

Other things on my list:

1. Simple linen shorts.
I’m not going to go as short as Cécile does in the movie. I like these because they don’t have any visible buttons or cuffs. Very clean.

Boden Shorts

Richmond Shorts, Boden, $27.40-$41.10

2. High-waisted shorts.

3. Men’s or Men’s-style shirt.
Still on the lookout for the perfect color.

4. A simple gold bangle.
I think a bangle would really complete things. Something super simple, like this Kate Spade bangle:

Kate Spade  Bangle

Heart of Gold Bangle, Kate Spade, $32.00

5. Simple necklace.
I have a necklace at my mother’s house that was hers in the 60s that would suit this perfectly.

6. Sleeveless blouse.

7. Patterned cropped pants.

8. Plain cropped pants.

9. T-shirt out of thick material with a high neckline.

10. Lightweight but stiff long-sleeved shirt.

Have any movies inspired you, fashion-wise? What are you dreaming about wearing in the summer?

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Prism X11 Dark Autumn Palette Review, Part 1

I recently purchased the Prism X11 Dark Autumn palette. This is a new alternative to the True Colour International/Invent Your Image/Indigo Tones palettes already on the market for people who have been draped in or have DIYed a Sci\ART color space. While the other brands’ palettes all look relatively similar–the TCI and IYI ones especially–these look radically different.

The other fans more or less match up with the original Sci\ART fans created by Kathryn Kalisz.
sciartda

There might be a few colors added here or there, but even the order is pretty much the same. The new Prism X11 fans were not created from these palettes, although Nikki Bogardus, the creator, does have original Sci\ART drapes at her disposal and was trained by Kalisz. Instead, they were created in collaboration with a Munsell color scientist, using a Spectrophotometer to determine the exact level of hue, value, and chroma in a given color. Each palette contains 70 “core” colors for your season. I will be doing a color-by-color comparison of the TCI Dark Autumn palette and the Prism X11 palette in another post. Outside of their similarity to Kalisz’s palettes, I am not sure how the exact colors for the other palettes were determined.

palette closed

For this post, I’d like to focus on the PrismX11 palette itself, and how it differs overall from the other palette I have. First, the packaging. It comes in a plastic case that is open on one side. I like this because I’m always misplacing the plastic sleeve my TCI palette came in. I take it out of the sleeve, set the sleeve down somewhere, and then start swatching, completely forgetting where I put the sleeve. The PrismX11 is held together with a fastener that unscrews, enabling you to add more color swatches as they become available, which is an interesting concept. I don’t think these extra colors are available yet, but the expandability is a nice bonus feature. It comes secured with a rubber band–the case is hard and there is extra space for the additional pages. Nikki sells some accessories for the palettes, like tassels in your colors and leather cases, but some kind of elastic band would also be maybe a nice thing to add as an option.

palette open

The palette itself is printed on thick glossy paper, rather than the canvas of the TCI palettes. The colors seem much more complex and rich than the canvas ones, but I’m not sure if it’s better for fabric swatching, due to the difference in material.

palette full

The palette also has more features than the TCI palettes. It even has an index. The extras include information on the season from Kathryn Kalisz (including some information on design lines!), which I really like having, plus the names of colors she mentioned for the season. It also has a visual representation of the season’s hue/value/chroma settings, which I’m assuming replicate the settings for the Spectrophotoometer.

palette contents

The palette definitely has a darker and more muted feel than the other palette I have. Partially it’s because the darker colors are at the top of the fan. Some Dark season people prefer this, because they find their darkest colors to be the most important. I like to have it the other way around. The light colors are the hardest to get right, and the worst when they’re wrong–for me, anyway. It also just makes the palette seem darker and heavier than it actually is. I’ll go more in depth on this in my next post, but while it looks a lot darker than the other palette, a lot of the colors are very similar–it just doesn’t have the lightest and brightest of the TCI DA fan’s colors, nor does it have an icy strip.

My overall thoughts, so far, are that I’m excited to have two options as far as Dark Autumn palettes go. I’m not sure if I would have picked this up if I didn’t want to review it and see if there were a decent option beyond the fan I already own, but now that I have it, I think it’s good to know that there is a scientific basis for these particular colors being on the palette. I will go more into the colors and how they compare to the other fan in my next post, but they are less overwhelmingly dark than it may seem from photographs or from your first impression, and I think a lot of DAs are going to find this a better option, especially if they struggle with certain aspects of the other DA palettes (i.e., the lighter and brighter colors are difficult for them to wear). I feel like our makeup options are represented better on this palette, too.

The fans can be ordered directly from the PrismX11 website and cost 54 USD. Shipping is $3.99 within the US. When I tried to order from the site, it said shipping to Europe was also $3.99, and since that didn’t make sense to me, I contacted Nikki, and she told me shipping was $13.50 and I placed my order with her personally via email. So if you’re in the US, it’s significantly cheaper than buying from TCI, whose fans are $60, but if you’re in Europe, it’s about the same.

Nikki also sells a book with the colors from all the palettes, which I think is a great tool for DIYers or for the merely color-obsessed.

Part 2 of my review, with color comparisons to the TCI palette, will be up Friday.

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On My Color Experience

I got the PrismX11 palette in the mail yesterday, and I’m really excited to be able to share this palette with everyone. Before I do, though, I thought it was necessary to clarify some things about my experience with and approach to color, in case some people haven’t been reading from the beginning.

I’m going to be reviewing the Dark Autumn palette, and comparing it to the True Colour International version. I think it’s important for people to know that I have never been draped as anything. I came to Deep Autumn completely on my using, using the Color DIY process I have outlined.

So I don’t make any judgments in my review as to how this palette works for me as a Dark Autumn. People who practice Caygill have told me that they see me as something between Spring and Autumn. I have heard between “light spring and soft autumn.” This means, I think, that I am a lighter person, on the warm side, but too muted for Light Spring. Soft Autumn is too muted. I think I ended up in Dark Autumn as a need for an autumn that is brighter than SA.

I don’t know if this is what a color analyst would see if I sat in the draping chair and under the lights. I find that the Dark Autumn colors feel right on me, the makeup works on my face, and I think they are right for my energy.

I do find, generally, that dark colors are easier for me to wear than light ones. The wrong light color reacts horribly with my complexion. A dark color that is too cool makes me look a little gray but nothing too noticeable; the wrong light color makes me look hungover.

TCI (left) and PrismX11 (right)

TCI (left) and PrismX11 (right)

You can see that the very brightest DA colors (mainly the ones at the top of the TCI palette) are the ones that are missing from the new palette. These colors work well for me, as a lighter person, but I know that a lot of other DAs struggle to make these colors work and stick to the darker colors in the palette. If I were going by the color selection alone, as a lighter person, I’d probably go with TCI for myself, although I love the new purples and greens the PrismX11 has. I think most draped DAs, however, are darker than I am, and will find the absence of the colors I mentioned and overall increased dark impression of the PrismX11 palette to be a welcome change.

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Breakout Roles: Alexis Bledel

Previously: Natalie Portman

This is occasional series I’ve started where I give my best guess on a celebrity’s Kibbe Image Identity–I look at their roles and image, versus an analysis of their physical features and body type. Last time, I decided that Natalie Portman is SG. This time, I’m going to reach a similar conclusion about an actress who is rather similar to her, with a similar debate about her type.

I’ve never seen Gilmore Girls until recently, when I decided to start binge watching it while laid up in bed with a upper respiratory tract infection. So far, I’m up to season four, and for me, the clues about Alexis’s type come less from what kind of character Rory Gilmore is and more about what other people on the show say about her.

One of the ways David Kibbe characterized gamines in general in our FG Facebook group is that “you can’t be sure if she is a waif under the bridge… Or a princess in waiting!” I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a modern example of an actress that fits this characterization better than Alexis.

paris waif
audrey1
audrey2
audrey3

It is, in fact, easy to put Alexis into Audrey’s roles. The princess out for a day of fun in Roman Holiday, the bookstore intellectual-turned-model in Funny Face… She’d be perfect. She has similar qualities of vulnerability, charm, and intelligence that make her appealing.

After thinking about it, it’s hard for me to understand why her Flamboyant Gamine Image ID isn’t more obvious to people, and I have no idea why she is put into Dramatic Classic and Soft Classic on Pinterest. She is a deer, which huge eyes and a surprisingly long body for her face (5’7″). I could easily seen her as a 1960s teen sensation like Twiggy.

Classics, to me, have a more solid presence on screen. In fact, I think that if Rory Gilmore had been played by a Classic, it would have been too much. Of course the Grace Kelly facsimile got in Harvard, Princeton, and Yale; had every boy fall in love with her at first sight; and had mega-millionaire grandparents! But that little added Gamine charm helps to make her more appealing on screen (not that Classics don’t have enormous appeal, but at some point, there is just too much perfection).

Final Verdict: Flamboyant Gamine

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Home Decorating with Flamboyant Gamine, Type 3, and Dark Autumn

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I recently wrote about adding Type 3 to my style mix. In addition to clothing style, however, I am also interested in interior design, and as I look to the next year, I’ve also started thinking about the new room I’ll have after my move. Now, I have no idea how things will work out financially, but I’ve decided that the time has come for me to break up with IKEA.

I would like my space to express my energy type and my individual style. I’ve decided that the things I’ll be looking for are:
-mid-century modernesque lines/modern/art deco (FG)
-rich, saturated color palette (DA, T3)
-texture (T3)
-fun (FG)

Things I’m trying to avoid are cool metals, black, and gray. My preferred metal is brass, but gold is okay too. Textiles are something I’m going to concern myself with later, but so far, this is what I have picked out for my room… provided I somehow end up with thousands of dollars to spend on furniture.

1. Mid-Century Wall Desk, $799, West Elm.
West Elm actually has an entire Mid-Century collection, and while it’s tempting and easy to just get the whole collection, I think taking a more eclectic approach looks more contemporary. But it means that there are shelves that pair perfectly with them, if you have the space (and the cash).
walldeskshelves

2. Dondra Bed, $899, CB2.
I like the textured look of the wood in this bed (very Type 3), as well as the clean lines. I want a bed with a solid headboard, but I don’t like the upholstered ones. I’m a little concerned how this wood would look with the rest of what I picked out, but it’s something I’d have to see in person.

Sanford Chair, $499, Pottery Barn.
This chair reminds me of the kind of a chair you’d find on a very fashionable 1930s film set. It was actually relatively hard to find a chair that was brass instead of silver. I’m not sure how comfortable this would be, and I may have to continue searching for an office chair, but I think this would be great as a chair to sit in and do my makeup at…

4. Memento Mirror Cabinet, $749, CB2.
I love this. As I said, I would use it as a dressing table, but it’s also something that is very flexible, and in the future, when I have an entire house or apartment to decorate, it would go great in an foyer, for example, or it could serve as a liquor cabinet (if you want a mirror above your liquor cabinet, that is…).

5. SAIC Sling Nightstand-Side Table, $249, CB2.
Yes, this has some black, but I think it makes for a very cool nightstand. The brass will pick up the other brass in the room, while also breaking up all the wood. It’s also just such a unique, creative design. There is a desk from the same line that is also unique and cool, but while I’m willing to compromise with a touch of black, so much metal that isn’t brass or gold isn’t happening.

6. Shop Blue Chest, $429, CB2.
This will also break up the wood and add some color. It’s a little small, but buying two and pushing them togehter would work, as you can see in this picture with the Dondra Bed:

shop-blue-chest2

Now, my hope is that this would also look purposefully eclectic, rather than just mismatched… but I guess I’d have to see everything in person to be sure. If not, well, back to the drawing board–not like it’s likely I’ll be getting any of this anytime soon, unless I win the lottery.

A lamp, however, is well within my reach.

These lamps from West Elm are especially cool because they have USB PORTS built into them. No struggling with a wall outlet behind the nightstand, or between the bed and the wall. Technology is amazing.

Anyway, these are my fantasy picks for when I start furnishing a room with “adult” furniture, keeping my various types in mind. How do you furnish your living space? Do you consider your style types?

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Back to Dressing Your Truth

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Dressing Your Truth was one of the first systems I discovered, which I’m sure is true for many of you as well. I quickly moved onto Kibbe and then onto systems like Zyla, but while I never dressed in a Type, I always maintained an interest in the system, at least the psychological aspects of it.

Recently, though, I’ve signed up for the Lifestyle service, since I have always liked watching Carol Tuttle’s videos, even if I never really seriously tried to dress my Truth. I think that the style quotient has been upped since I first discovered it, and I’m started to see how Type 3 (I believe I’m 3/4) can be integrated with Flamboyant Gamine and Dark Autumn.

One thing I noticed when I was trying other seasons is that I could physically feel like they were wrong. Bright Spring, for instance, made me feel tired. I couldn’t keep up with that level of chroma. I can see and feel why Type 3 makes sense for me. Swiftness, angularity, rich colors–all things I need.

Another aspect of Dressing Your Truth that intrigues me is the idea that dressing in the correct way for you supports you and improves other areas of your life. This is present to an extent in other systems, such as Kibbe, and I’m actually working on a separate post about this right now. But I’ve recognized that I’ve spent a lot of my life leaning too much on my Type 4 secondary, which has led to me being seen in a negative way at times. Or perhaps it’s that when I wear black and gray, which is still my default, although I’m trying to wean myself off them, my natural Type 3 “push” comes off as rude or unexpected. So I’m excited to try and work on making sure my Type 3 dominates, and making sure that what I put on my body supports that.

Also, despite having a blog about it, I haven’t been the best at always dressing head to toe, or even correctly for my colors and type. Dressing Your Truth puts a lot of emphasis on doing this in a way that is accessible. Doing my hair and makeup and wearing jewelry every day is something that can make a real difference, and I don’t currently do that. I’m not planning on getting a new wardrobe overnight, even though I know Dressing Your Truth suggests committing to dressing in your type completely for a month. What I am going to do is not buy silver jewelry or the aforementioned black and gray, and focus on doing my hair and makeup and wearing jewelry every day.

One thing I will be careful of, however, is not to go too far into Flamboyant Natural territory. This is something I learned last year when I was experimenting with Gamine Autumn and Mellow Autumn. Things that look too handmade or like something you’d find on an archaelogical dig aren’t for me. This embossed leather cuff, with the paisley design and raw edges, isn’t for me. Instead, for a cuff I’d choose something like these:

These have a cleaner and more modern feel, while still being textured, edgy, and substantial. Then if I wanted to layer, I could add something like this bangle from the DYT store.

Since delving into the Lifestyle content, I’ve realized that Dressing Your Truth really is about you, and just because these styles that look more FN look right at home on some of the Type 3 experts doesn’t mean that all Type 3s will dress that way, or that it will feel right on them. I can have my own Type 3 style, and use Type 3 and FG in combination to support each other to have a style that is all my own.

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Instinct vs. Desire

As someone who has never had a professional analysis of any kind, I’ve relied entirely on my own experience and instincts. Naturally, I have doubts. What these doubts boil down to is this: Am I seeing what is there, or am I seeing what I want to see?

Carol Tuttle often mentions our “beauty sixth sense.” Sometimes I question whether I’m actually listening to that, or just going with what I like. For instance, I’ve always been attracted to what is shown as the stereotypical Flamboyant Gamine look. In high school, there were periods where I dressed mod. Audrey Hepburn and Edie Sedgwick were my fashion idols.

FG feels good; often, when I have doubts about something, I go into the FG section of the book and realize that what was giving me doubts is actually an FG “no”–wide, unconstructed dresses, for example. But I have small hands and feet, and my length is in my torso. So sometimes I question whether I’m actually an SG or an SN. When I tried SN, though, not only did I feel lumpy, but I felt tired without the structure of FG supporting me. So while I’m not sure whether it’s what David would give me, FG is how I feel my best.

Color is a bit trickier. I put myself in the Dark Autumn palette, which seems counter-intuitive on paper. But out of the 12 seasons of Sci\ART, it’s the one that seems to work the best. Spring is too bright; the Softs seem too muted. A brighter Autumn seems to be what works. But sometimes I wonder, is this really harmonizing with me? Am I fooling myself and these lipsticks are too dark and I’d look better in Soft Autumn or Soft Summer?

Today I ordered one of the new Prism X11 palettes. These palettes are created using a Spectrophotometer to measure the colors’ levels of hue. value, and chroma.

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

As you can see, compared to the Invent Your Image palette, this new palette seems a little darker and maybe even a bit cooler. (I am VERY excited to get my hands on those purples, though!) I will see how it works for me. I will do a full review and compare it to the palette I already own.

But still, seeing the depth of this palette really makes me question whether the DA color space is where I belong. In the end, though, I think what actually matters is how I feel in these colors and whether I look healthy and awake in them. I just have to be careful and make sure it’s not just because I happen to like these colors.

When to Stop

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Some people picked up Kibbe’s Metamorphosis when it was still in print in the late 80s and are no closer to finding their Image Identity 30 years later. Others got draped by Color Me Beautiful around the same time and now are flummoxed by the innovations in the seasonal color world. Some people have started more recently, but seem to switch seasons or Image IDs on a weekly basis.

My advice to anyone who finds themselves in this predicament is short and to the point: Stop.

Give yourself time to adjust and understand how a season or Image ID feels. Carol Tuttle advises that when you think you’ve found your Energy Type, try living in that Energy Type for a full month. This is sound advice not only for people interested in Dressing Your Truth, but for people interested in any other style system. You can’t judge how something works for you until you’ve given it a real shot and paid attention to how you look and feel wearing it.

Now, sometimes we don’t need a full month. I realized that Light and Bright Spring were wrong for me much quicker than that. Light Spring made me completely red; Bright Spring was tiring. But if you find yourself switching seasons or Image IDs every other week, I think it would be wise to just stop and say, “OK, I’m going to take the data I have on myself, and try to give one season a fair shot.”

And if you don’t switch seasons or Image IDs, but you’re just having doubts… Consider where those doubts are coming from. Are they because you feel like something is off, you feel tired, or like you need to wear extra makeup? Or are they there because you feel like you’ve left something on the table, some stone unturned?

The truth is, I don’t know if there is some absolute truth with all this stuff. I think it’s enough if you look good and it makes you happy. The only seasons I’ve really tried are Light Spring, Bright Spring, and Dark Autumn. I’ve draped myself in the other seasons, but these are the only ones I’ve tried living in. Once I felt happy with the Dark Autumn result, I got off the carousel and moved on with my life. We could all search forever. But in the end, the point is a workable wardrobe that we look good in. You won’t ever get there if you never stop second-guessing yourself, or if you let the advice of other people on Facebook, who often don’t know anymore than you do, get to you. You’re the one who has to live with it.

What has been your experience with knowing when to say when?

The Pros and Cons of Various Style Systems

Audrey Hepburn... DYT T4, Zyla Playful Winter, Kibbe Flamboyant Gamine (Source)

Audrey Hepburn… DYT T4, Zyla Playful Winter, Kibbe Flamboyant Gamine (Source)

I thought it would be helpful for people who are just starting to dip their toe into the style typing world if I shared my thoughts on the pluses and minuses of each of the systems I personally use or at least study. A system that works well for one person may not work at all for someone else.

DAVID KIBBE’S METAMORPHOSIS
Pros:
-Focused on self-acceptance and self-expression
-A wide variety of types
-A fully-integrated system with hair, makeup, color, etc. in addition to just clothing style
-The book is thorough and the kind that teaches you something new every time you read it
-More of an approach to dressing and life than just some instructions on how to wear what
Cons:
-Has been interpreted incorrectly over the years (there is a blog post coming up on this)
-David sees people in NYC only and the cost is that of a nice vacation
-The book recommendations are from the 80s
-Information on his color system is basically impossible to find for now, unless you go see him

DAVID ZYLA
Pros:
-Many people feel like he really “gets” them, color-and-style wise
-Travels frequently and charges <$1000 for both style and color, with several levels of sessions available to really help you hone your style -Has a book -Gives very concrete recommendations
Cons:
-You may not like what you get from him
-Since it’s so much about his vision, it’s basically impossible to DIY

DRESSING YOUR TRUTH
Pros:
-A good springboard to really thinking about your style
-The psychological aspects can be very helpful and healing
-Has a lot of extra online content
-Has an online store divided by type
-Now provides all four courses for what you used to pay for one
Cons:
-The styles may not be to your liking
-The palette for your energy type may not be the colors you find most flattering on you, or they may conflict with your Sci\ART season, etc.
-No longer does Skype sessions; seems to only do type confirmations for a select few and only in Utah now

FANTASTICAL BEAUTY
Pros:
-Offers a unique system unlike anything else
-Can be very easily integrated with other systems for self-expression purposes (i.e., Kibbe)
-Offers many different levels of services and all online
Cons:
-Is still really being developed, so sometimes the dots can be hard to connect

Sci\ART/12 BLUEPRINTS/12 TONES ETC.
Pros:
-12 beautiful palettes
-Popular; analysts in many places and easy to find lists of makeup colors etc.
-Can get enough materials (fans etc.) to reasonably figure it out at home
Cons:
-Schools of thought and analyst quality both vary–you may not be analyzed correctly
-You may not feel like you fit in any of the palettes perfectly

Systems I didn’t cover here are ones I either don’t like/recommend or don’t know enough about (Caygill). What do you think?

Three Levels of Dress: Five Puffers Under $200 (That I Don’t Hate)

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Now, I know it’s important to stay warm in winter. But so often, otherwise stylish people resort to the most boring puffer jackets ever designed once there is snow on the ground. So I decided to find some really unique and stylish puffer jackets across the yin/yang spectrum that still have some style while also being functional.

I would personally restrict puffer jackets to Level One. For Level Two and above, I would suggest finding a real wool coat or a vintage fur (I do not recommend faux, because one time in the snow and the fur will be that of a small child’s stuffed animal that has seen better days). If you can’t abide any animal options, be forewarned that you will be a little chillier. It is also much easier for find stylish and unique coats for all the types once you move into wool/fur coat territory.

I do have a few tips. One, look for interesting design details. If it looks like it comes from L.L. Bean or something like that, as nice as it is for shoveling snow or a winter hiking trip, it’s probably not going to look like the most fashionable thing around. Puffer jackets present a special challenge for yin types, and I think going shorter is better–shorter length, so it kind of looks like a short fur jacket, and then I also think shorter sleeves help. Get a long pair of leather gloves and it looks very chic, especially for Romantic/Theatrical Romantic, Soft Gamine/Flamboyant Gamine, Soft Classic, and Soft Dramatic.

As far as long yin coats, I didn’t really find any in stores, but I think if you look for “princess puffer coats,” you may come across some. I found some by searching for “lolita puffer” on eBay:

s-l500
(Auction)

As far as the jackets I found in regular online stores, one of the coolest ones I’ve found is this one from a brand called Silvian Heach.

Silvian Heach Down Jacket, $102, available in XS in pink and XXS-M in black

Silvian Heach Down Jacket $102, available in XS in pink and XXS-M in black

I think this would be very cute on an SG or a FG who would wear this kind of Chanel-style jacket. I think it may be a bit too quirky for either SC or Dramatic Classic.

 Snow Secret Down Jacket, $181, available in sizes 4-8 in black and 4, 6, and 12 in cream


Snow Secret Down Jacket, $181, available in sizes 4-8 in black and 4, 6, and 12 in cream

This jacket has the shorter length and slightly short/wide sleeves I mentioned. I see it as Romantic. The lace pattern is obviously yin, and I think it would look cute on top of a casual winter outfit.

Bomboogie Down Jacket, $130, available in sizes 4-8

Bomboogie Down Jacket, $130, available in sizes 4-8

This is one I could see working for a lot of people–basically Dark Winters who could wear a cape. The shape of this coat gives it the illusion of being a cape instead of a boring old jacket.

Calvin Klein Long-Sleeved Puffer Jacket, $99, available in sizes XS-XL

Calvin Klein Long-Sleeved Puffer Jacket, $99, available in sizes XS-XL

I think this jacket would be very cool on a Dramatic. It almost approaches avant-garde with its sleekness and asymmetrical design.

 Neve Scarlett Down Jacket $199.99, available in L and XL in charcoal and S-L in natural


Neve Scarlett Down Jacket $199.99, available in L and XL in charcoal and S-L in natural

I’m not sure who exactly would wear this. I think the collar, the asymmetry, and the wideness of the last section of the sleeve make for an unusual design for what seems like a very practical jacket. The collar can also be unzipped to for a wide neckline, for even more drama. I would have to try it on and I’m not always that fond of a waist, but I might wear it as an FG. I could see on an avant-garde natural. Maybe it would even work on a Dramatic who wanted to express a bit of a rustic touch.

All of these jackets are on sale right now. There seems to be a lot of more unusual designs on the site Yoox. What coat are you wearing for winter this year, if you’re in a place in the Northern Hemisphere that gets cold? Do you share my frustrations with the ubiquitous puffer jacket?

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